Students and Crime - The Facts

Despite a recent upsurge in domestic burglary, levels have fallen dramatically over the last few years.

They are 39% lower now than in 1997 - that's nearly 630,000 fewer burglaries and attempted burglaries. But you cannot be complacent.

Around one third of students become a victim of crime while at University. Here are some of the facts concerning students and crime:

You are in a relatively high risk group: students are known to be at high risk of all crime not just domestic burglary. They also often live in the more deprived parts of the town or city.

Almost one third of students have been the victim of a crime during the past 12 months

11.4% of burglary incidents were repeat incidents

The mean replacement cost for property stolen in a burglary is £906.00

11.8% of students in private accommodation experienced domestic burglary compared to only 5.4% of students in university accommodation. Generally university accommodation had far more security measures than private accommodation.

The most common crimes faced by students were criminal damage (25% of incidents), theft (24%) and burglary (22%).

Students who were victims of burglary lived in accommodation with fewer surveillance measures, on average, than student accommodation that was not burgled.

Students who were not a victim of a personal crime demonstrated more personal risk management behaviour (such as concealing their mobile phone, carrying a personal alarm, avoiding leaving drinks unattended) than those who were a victim.

Two thirds of robbery victims in one area of Manchester from October-December 200 were students

Today, students have more high-value consumer goods per head than the rest of the population; 85% own a computer or laptop, 86% have a phone and many have their own TV, stereo and car.

Almost 70% of student accommodation is empty during the holidays.

Over three times as many students own high value goods compared to 10 years ago.

Police research shows that students are the most targeted section of society by criminals.

Almost two thirds of all incidents are not reported to the police.

In around a quarter of burglaries, the thief gets in through an open door or window.

Less than half of the students in rented accommodation who have a burglar alarm use it.

More men than women are the victims of violent crime - nearly 14% of men compared to just under 4% of women.

Robbery and theft of mobile phones is the biggest crime affecting students - incidents have been occurring at a rate of 8-10 per day at one university.

Most robberies take place near pubs and clubs after victims have been drinking - the peak time being between 10pm and 6am.

1 in 5 stolen cheque and credit cards are taken from cars.

Theft of mobile phones account for 40% of car break-ins.

28% of all robberies now involve mobile phones, compared with 8% three years ago. In London alone, 51% of all robberies in January 2002 involved a mobile phone.

Even if your car is not worth very much, thieves will still have a go - nearly 80% of cars stolen are 7 years or older.